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It's hard to believe, but 2016 is passing fast, and we're booking dates for fall and winter '17. My newest book SWITCHED ON is on sale now.  Meanwhile, I'm busy with my car business, teaching, speaking, and advocacy work as well.  There's a lot going on!
Would you like to bring me to your college or conference? If so, contact Tom Gagnon or Sally Itterly, my speaking representatives at The Lavin Agency. Do you want to set up a program in your elementary, middle, or high school? I handle those directly; write me at john@johnrobison.com.

Discovery Science Channel
Last year I was profiled in an episode of INGENIOUS MINDS on Discovery Science. The show is rerun with some frequency; check the Discovery Science Channel website for details.  Meanwhile, you can watch it here on YouTube

Want to hear me talk about my new book, SWITCHED ON?
Check out this interview on NPR Here and Now

Read about SWITCHED ON in this NY Times review

Listen to Terry Gross, Alvaro Pascual Leone and me talk about TMS and Switched On, on Fresh Air

May 4, South Hadley, MA
Join me at 7PM at Odyssey Books, in the Village Commons for a public talk and Q&A about TMS, brain stimulation, autism and Switched On

May 11-14, Baltimore MD
IMFAR Autism Science Conference - registration required

May 13 - noon - community lunch with John Donvan/Caren Zucker, authors of In A Different Key

May 19, Providence RI
I will be speaking about TMS - brain stimulation - and my new SWITCHED ON book with Dr. Lindsay Oberman, one of the researchers who stars in the story. This is a free event, open to the public and sponsored by Bradley Hospital.

June 3-4, Greenwich, CT
Greenwich Motor Car concours

June 11-12 Washington DC
The College of William & Mary has a few slots left in our summer neurodiversity course, held at our DC campus in the Carnegie Building near Dupont Circle.  Register and read more here

July 25-29, Asheville NC
RROC National Meet

Sept 3-4 Sydney, Australia
Festival of Dangerous Ideas

Sept 5, Adelaide, Australia
Adelaide Writers Festival out of season event

Sept 6 Melbourne, Australia
Autism Awareness event Melbourne

Sept 7-11, Brisbane, Australia
Brisbane Writers Festival

Sept 16-19, Stowe. VT
Join us at the British Invasion - the largest British cars show and lifestyle event in the USA

Sept 17, Burlington, VT
I'll be appearing at the Burlington Book Festival

Sept 16-Oct 2, West Springfield, MA
Join me in West Springfield, MA for the 100th anniversary of The Big E - New England's Carnival

Oct 22, Chicago, IL
National Pediatric Developmental Differences Forum (registration required) (link to come)

{about John Elder Robison}

I was born in Athens, Georgia in the hot summer of 1957. My father was preaching in Ila — pronounced EYE-LA — Georgia, that summer. Both my parents were in college when I was born. We moved every few years while my father worked his way through college until finally settling as a professor of Philosophy in Amherst, Massachusetts. Me as a kid.

I was always a problem child — often sad, a loner, unable to make friends. My parents sent me to a number of different schools, and I saw many different therapists, but none of them had the answers. Some of them had some pretty strange ideas, though! My brother Augusten Burroughs chronicled some of our family’s misadventures in therapy in his 2002 book, Running With Scissors.

The problem was, Asperger’s Syndrome had not yet been “discovered” as a diagnosis when I was a kid. My social disability was dismissed as laziness, or deliberate misbehavior. I dropped out of high school in the tenth grade.

from left: Peter Frampton, John Regan, Tex Holmes, Ace Frehley and me.

Luckily, my Asperger’s gave me a rare insight into electronics. Using that knowledge, I joined a band, which led to a bigger band, which led to a bigger band… I ended up designing special effects guitars for KISS by the late 1970s. From there, I made the leap into a real job as an engineer with a major toy and game company. I moved up the corporate ladder for ten years, when I hit a wall.

By the late 1980s I had become a manager at a Boston electronics firm, but I was miserable. I had no idea how to fit into a corporate environment, and I felt sure my differences would mark me as a fraud, someone who should tossed in the street or worse. Finally, I had enough. I quit my job. I began fixing Mercedes and Land Rover cars in my driveway. I never had to worry about fitting in with the world of machines. Soon, I was immersed in them.

From that beginning, J E Robison Service grew into one of the most successful independent repair businesses in New England. We specialize in Mercedes, BMW, Jaguar, Land Rover, Rolls-Royce and Bentley motor car work. Our company is known nationwide for our restoration and customization work, especially on Land Rover, Rolls-Royce, and Bentley vehicles.

One day, a therapist with a lust for Land Rovers walked in the door at JE Robison Service, and we became friends. After studying me closely, he introduced me to Asperger's Syndrome, and the knowledge changed my life forever. It took some time, and a lot of hard work, but the knowledge of how and why I am different transformed my life.

Today, we know Asperger’s syndrome is one form of autism. The collection of differences are called the autism spectrum. Autism is at its heart a communication disorder or difference. Some autistic people have difficulty speaking, or understanding language. Asperger people tend to be blind to the unspoken cues of other people.

My memoir of growing up different was published in 2007. Look Me in the Eye was an instant bestseller which launched me on yet another career. Today it’s sold in over 20 editions in 70+ countries worldwide. My second book – Be Different – is now following in its footsteps.

Read more about Raising Cubby.

I’ve found a new calling as a speaker and advocate for people with Asperger’s and other forms of autism. Read more about my speaking and workshops here.

The more I learned about autism and Asperger’s, the more I realized how diverse this autism spectrum really is. Science has identified a number of traits that tie us all together, yet on the surface we could not possibly look more different. There is no such thing as a “typical autistic person.”

Some describe us as gifted while others talk about disability. For every autistic person who has a family and a job, several others struggle but fail to attain those goals.

Seeing that, I began to understand the pressing need to develop therapies and services to help autistic people at all levels succeed in today’s world. At the same time, I realized the wider world needs us; and they need help understanding how to accommodate us and help us fit in.

In the past few years, I have become active on boards and committees of the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control, Autism Speaks, and a number of universities and colleges. I'm interested in selecting the most promising research that will improve the quality of life for people at all points on the autism spectrum, and I'm interested in legal, ethical, and social issues relating to autism and advocacy.

This year (2012) Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius named me to the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee which develops – among other things - the Strategic Plan for autism research that guides NIH, CDC, and many private researchers.

I'm continuing my academic work as well. For 2013, I look forward to beginning a collaboration with researchers and faculty at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst – stay tuned for details.

With all that, I'm a pretty busy fellow. But through it all, my love of cars has not diminished. Whenever I'm not on the road, you'll still find me in the shop, at JE Robison Service in Springfield.

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